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MessaggioInviato: lun set 09, 2019 1:57 pm 
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Iscritto il: ven gen 11, 2019 2:47 pm
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Località: Bologna
Seccato Saikawa a fine mese.


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MessaggioInviato: lun set 09, 2019 2:14 pm 
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Iscritto il: ven apr 28, 2006 6:03 pm
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Nissan's chairman of the board said CEO Hiroto Saikawa will step down this month and that Nissan Chief Operating Officer Yasuhiro Yamauchi will serve as acting CEO while the company seeks a full-time boss.

The chairman, Yasushi Kimura, said Saikawa will step down effective Sept. 16 and that the company hopes to make a decision on his successor by the end of October.

Kimura's comments came as the company's board outlined the findings of an internal investigation into the misconduct that led to the arrest of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn and left Japan's second-largest automaker beset in turmoil.

Saikawa had recently indicated a willingness to resign, and the board unanimously felt it was better to act on the matter immediately, Kimura said at a hastily called late-night press conference at Nissan's global headquarters here south of Tokyo.

"We felt immediate action would be appropriate," Kimura said.

Nissan has a short list of 10 possible successors, including at least one woman, a non-Japanese and one person with experience at French alliance partner Renault, said Masakazu Toyoda, chair of Nissan's recently created nomination committee.

The list was narrowed down from about 100 candidates over the course of the summer. The selection process began in July, Toyoda said.

Saikawa, 65, had come under increasing pressure to step down amid fresh revelations he exercised a stock-linked compensation scheme to boost his payout by nearly $500,000.

In June, Nissan shareholders approved Saikawa's reappointment to the board, despite growing controversy about his oversight during the time of Ghosn's alleged misdeeds.

Saikawa served as co-CEO with Ghosn, 65, during a one-year transition before taking control as solo CEO in 2017. But since then, Saikawa's tenure has only been besieged by scandal.

The first crisis erupted in late 2017, when Nissan disclosed it had been conducting faulty final inspections of vehicles at assembly plants throughout Japan.

That triggered the recall more than 1.2 million vehicles in Japan, a call back of virtually every passenger car the company produced for sale in Japan over the previous three years.

More inspection misconduct was uncovered in 2018, and then came Ghosn's arrest.

After Ghosn's takedown, Saikawa was among his harshest critics.

Saikawa's initial denunciations were all the more shocking in Japan, because he was long seen as Ghosn right-hand man.

Ghosn parachuted into Nissan as the Renault-installed "Cost Cutter" to revive the struggling Japanese automaker through fiscal discipline.

But it was Saikawa who won Ghosn's trust as the enforcer who helped break the Nissan keiretsu of affiliated suppliers in the early days of the Nissan revival plan. And later, as Nissan's veteran chief competitive officer, he helped chart the company's course with Ghosn.

Since Ghosn's arrest and indictment, however, Nissan has plunged into upheaval.

The company was soon beset by a flurry of executive exits and departures to other companies.

Saikawa struggled to rekindle operating profit that plunged 99 percent in the fiscal first quarter, reboot flailing U.S. sales and mend strained ties with Renault.

Japan's No. 2 automaker is also laying off 12,500 workers and trying to reform corporate governance.

The recent allegations that Saikawa gamed Nissan's share-linked incentive program to deliver a bigger personal payout further tarnished his tenure amid mounting pressure to step aside.


Il successore di Saikawa sarà Yamauchi, per adesso nominato ad interim. Chissà se avrà più fortuna. La situazione di Nissan non è per niente stabile, devono iniziare una pesante ristrutturazione e trovare la quadra con Renault.


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MessaggioInviato: lun set 09, 2019 3:48 pm 
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Iscritto il: mar gen 23, 2007 3:06 pm
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daimlerchrysler ha scritto:
e trovare la quadra con Renault.


Quello non dovrebbe essere un problema!

https://www.autoscout24.it/annunci/rena ... cldtidx=13

:briaco

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MessaggioInviato: lun set 09, 2019 4:00 pm 
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Iscritto il: ven gen 11, 2019 2:47 pm
Messaggi: 600
Località: Bologna
:ridi
Per inciso, auto tecnicamente molto particolare, fra le altre cose con motori trasversali se 1.7l oppure longitudinali se 2.0l ed oltre.
Chiuso OT.


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MessaggioInviato: mar set 10, 2019 11:18 am 
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Iscritto il: ven apr 28, 2006 6:03 pm
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Joe Nocera is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He has written business columns for Esquire, GQ and the New York Times, and is the former editorial director of Fortune. His latest project is the Bloomberg-Wondery podcast "The Shrink Next Door."
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In Japan, is there one standard of justice for Japanese executives and another for non-Japanese executives? The forced resignation on Monday of Nissan Motor Co.’s chief executive officer, Hiroto Saikawa, certainly seems to suggest as much.

When Nissan wanted to get rid of its then-chairman Carlos Ghosn, it conducted an internal investigation that was kept from Ghosn, found some examples of allegedly inflated compensation, sent the evidence to prosecutors — again without its chairman knowing — and patiently waited for a surprise arrest when Ghosn landed in Toyko last November.

Ghosn then spent the next four months in a small jail cell, under dire conditions that were designed to break him and force a confession. “Hostage justice,” Ghosn criminal defense lawyer Takashi Takano calls it.

Although Ghosn was released on bail in March, he remains essentially under house arrest. One of the conditions of his bail is that he is not allowed to communicate with his wife, Carole. “Ridiculous and inhumane,” fumed Takano in a conversation I had with him a few weeks ago. (In a statement issued Monday afternoon, Ghosn described Nissan’s allegations as “baseless,” and described the company’s actions against him as “their orchestrated coup.”)

Now consider Saikawa’s situation.

A fierce opponent of Ghosn’s plan to merge Nissan with its smaller alliance partner, Renault SA, Saikawa took charge once Ghosn landed in prison. He was, by most accounts, a terrible CEO, unable to heal the rift with Renault, while his tenure, as Bloomberg News put it, was “marked by a series of missteps.” (He skipped a news conference in which he was supposed to talk about the company’s falsification of emissions data, for instance.) He also failed to stem a steep profit decline: Earnings were down 94 percent in the quarter that ended in June. Over the last year, Nissan’s stock price has dropped nearly in half.

Last week, the results of an internal investigation revealed that Saikawa had received compensation that was … well, whaddya know? … inflated. According to Bloomberg News, he was overpaid by $841,000 via stock appreciation rights. Three other executives were also overpaid — including, irony of ironies, Hari Nada, the former head of Nissan’s CEO office, who was the first to raise questions about Ghosn’s compensation.

In response to all of that, did a whistle-blower inside Nissan launch a secret investigation? Did anyone turn over evidence to prosecutors? Were Saikawa and the others arrested, tossed in jail and interrogated endlessly? You know the answer to that: Of course not.

Instead, the Nissan board unanimously voted to demand Saikawa’s resignation. That’s no doubt humiliating. But it’s not even remotely on par with what happened — and is still happening — to Ghosn.

Who did blow the whistle on Saikawa? That would be Greg Kelly, Ghosn’s former deputy. Kelly and his family say Hari Nada lured Kelly back to Japan so that he too could be thrown in jail and charged with crimes related to Ghosn’s compensation. In June, Kelly gave an incendiary interview to a Japanese magazine in which he also said that Saikawa had signed off on Ghosn’s allegedly hidden compensation.

I don’t have a problem with how Nissan handled the Saikawa scandal. A whistle-blower’s allegation led to an internal investigation — one that everyone in the company knew about — which in turn led to the CEO’s ouster. Saikawa has also promised to return his excess compensation. That seems like the right solution.

The better question is: Why couldn’t Nissan have acted in the same manner in dealing with l’affaire Ghosn?

Yes, it was more complicated in that Ghosn was also Renault’s CEO and the mastermind of an automotive alliance that included Mitsubishi. Surely, though, Nissan’s Japanese executives could have found another way to oust him without scheming to have him arrested. If, after they’d pushed him out, prosecutors felt he had committed crimes, then fine. Arrest him. And if that’s the right path, then do the same with Saikawa.

Nissan said that in searching for a new CEO, the company will look at “non-Japanese, women and people from Renault,” according to Bloomberg News. But would any non-Japanese manager really be interested in taking the helm at Nissan given what happened to Ghosn? It’s a little hard to envision.

An American I know with years of experience with a Japanese multinational told me once that the Japanese criminal justice system makes a distinction between two kinds of corporate crime. If the wrongdoing is part of an effort to help the company, the culprit will usually get off with a slap on the wrist. But if its purpose is to enrich oneself, the system comes down hard on the wrongdoer.

Based on what we’ve seen with Nissan over these past months, I’d say there is another distinction the Japanese criminal justice system makes: Regardless of the severity or nature of a crime, if you’re a non-Japanese executive accused of wrongdoing you’re at risk of getting tossed into prison.

Interessante editoriale di Bloomberg riguardo le dimissioni di Saikawa e la mancanza di terzietá della giustizia giapponese. Saikawa si è dimesso ma in realtà il board di Nissan lo ha sfiduciato una volta venuti alla luce gli appropriamenti indebiti di buona parte del management giapponese. L’altro manager arrestato con Ghosn lo scorso novembre, Greg Kelly, aveva iniziato ad esporre gli scheletri negli armadi del management che ha fatto fuori Ghosn. Il board of directors ha dovuto prendere atto della situazione e ha de facto licenziato Saikawa. Non è stata intrapresa nessuna azione legale, nel caso di Ghosn quando affiorarono i primi sospetti molti manager giapponesi iniziarono a complottare e a riportare le informazioni alla polizia. Nel caso di Saikawa (pessimo manager tra l’altro) addirittura è stata licenziata l’avvocatessa americana incaricata di controllare eventuali violazioni delle regole di condotta da parte del management. Saikawa incasserà una ricca liquidazione e rimarrà incensurato. Ghosn è agli arresti domiciliari, la sua fortuna economica sta svanendo e non può neanche parlare a telefono con la propria moglie.
Nissan ha dichiarato che verranno valutati come candidati anche non giapponesi, mi domando quale occidentale sia così idiota da accettare l’incarico.


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MessaggioInviato: mer set 11, 2019 11:05 am 
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Iscritto il: ven apr 28, 2006 6:03 pm
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Candidati alla successione di Saikawa. Non pensò proprio che Schillaci possa diventare CEO.


COO Yasuhiro Yamauchi, who will become acting CEO on Sept. 16. Yamauchi, 63, is a Nissan lifer who also sits on the board of Renault. He was promoted to chief operating officer earlier this year, partly to preserve management ties between the automakers.

Makoto Uchida, president of Nissan’s China joint venture. Like many other automakers, Nissan counts the country as its single biggest market, contributing almost a third of its operating income in recent years.
Hideyuki Sakamoto, in charge of manufacturing and supply-chain management, joined Nissan in 1980 as an engineer and has worked around the world, including the Nissan Technical Center in North America, Nissan’s largest affiliate supplier in Japan and Renault in Brazil.

Jun Seki, formerly Nissan’s China chief, is now senior vice president overseeing “performance recovery.” A Nissan lifer who joined in 1986, Seki worked in engineering and production, and has mostly kept a low profile.

Daniele Schillaci, the CEO of brake manufacturer Brembo, left Nissan earlier this year. As executive vice president at Nissan, he led sales and marketing. Before that Schillaci was at Toyota from 2002 to 2015 at various positions in Europe. Close to Renault, who he has worked for, the Italian executive has confronted Saikawa in the past at meetings, and may make a strong external candidate.


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MessaggioInviato: gio set 12, 2019 10:44 am 
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Iscritto il: mar gen 23, 2007 3:06 pm
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daimlerchrysler ha scritto:
Ghosn è agli arresti domiciliari, la sua fortuna economica sta svanendo e non può neanche parlare a telefono con la propria moglie.


c'è di peggio... :briaco

non ho seguito tutta la trafila; ma oltre che in Giappone sta venendo processato anche da noi?

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MessaggioInviato: gio set 12, 2019 12:05 pm 
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Iscritto il: ven apr 28, 2006 6:03 pm
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Non ancora, ma ci sono molte indagini in Olanda dove ha sede la società che controlla i pacchetti azionari delle 3 aziende. Ci sono diversi pagamenti dubbiosi fatti a Ghosn in Olanda nel corso degli anni.


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